Something to read: Crime and Punishment redux: that fixie case –via RoubaixCycling.cc

Whilst we were debating whether to dip our feet into this murky swamp, right now we would probably struggle to do a sufficiently good job of it. Fortunately, our friend over at RoubaixCycling has done the hard work for us. And there are a few things to deal with there. The first is driving, does it matter that cyclists generally cycle and drivers drive? No. The crucial aspect here is that the term ‘carriage’ operates (since the case of Taylor v Goodwin 1879) as a term defining any vehicle and including bicycles. That’s the key point. Source: Crime and Punishment … Continue reading Something to read: Crime and Punishment redux: that fixie case –via RoubaixCycling.cc

Something to read: Mid-Wales Micro Adventure – by @cyclestuffblog

We’re not the only ones embracing bikepacking this year. Over at CycleStuff, Simon shares his own adventure in the wilds of Mid Wales. Simon can always be relied upon for his excellent photos and this looks like it was a lot of fun. On Saturday, I headed into Powys for a micro-adventure* with two of my mountain biking/fell running/music loving/whisky sipping** buddies; Jules Carter and Matt Morris. Outside of adventure racing stuff like the Polaris/OMM, surprisingly this was the first time the three of us had engaged in any mountain bike packing. We were treated to a glorious […] via Mid … Continue reading Something to read: Mid-Wales Micro Adventure – by @cyclestuffblog

Something to read: The Impact of Road Projects in England

It is pretty widely understood, apparently outside political circles, that if you build roads you get more traffic. A report commissioned by the Campaign to Protect Rural England looked into the effects of major road projects and unsurprisingly found that yes, you do indeed get more traffic. CPRE commissioned consultants Transport for Quality of Life Community Interest Company (TfLQ) to examines the impacts of road schemes on traffic, the environment, the economy, road safety and land use. Source: The Impact of Road Projects in England – Campaign to Protect Rural England This is particularly pertinent to us here in South Wales, … Continue reading Something to read: The Impact of Road Projects in England

Something to read: Rides of Way, by CyclingUK

Following a survey of over 11,000 off-road riders, CyclingUK has produced a report into the motivations, perceptions and habits of the UK’s growing mountain biking community. The survey was carried out jointly with OpenMTB, who you may remember from a gathering that was held to coincide with the Welsh Government’s consultation on improving access to the countryside back in September 2015. A first of its kind in the UK, Rides of Way provides unique insight into the current off-road cycling scene based on the 11,482 responses the initial survey received. Cycling UK believes the report will be of particular use … Continue reading Something to read: Rides of Way, by CyclingUK

Something to read: Driving…an extinction event –by West Midlands Police

West Midlands Police, the pioneering force behind #opclosepass are excelling themselves right now. Not only are they making waves across the UK with their close pass initiative, they are also producing some fantastic posts on their blog. Their latest one really is a thing of beauty. It’ll be uncomfortable reading for any petrolheads among you, but heartwarming for anyone who cycles, walks or just despairs at the quality of driving you see on today’s roads. Yet we have shown as a collective, us drivers and riders of mechanically propelled vehicles, that we are incapable of carrying the burden and shrug … Continue reading Something to read: Driving…an extinction event –by West Midlands Police

The Lion’s Share –via Singletrack Magazine

We have some more required reading for you today, courtesy of Bez. Here he rails against the fallacy that is the phrase “share the road”. It’s very long, spectacularly well evidenced and absolutely worth a read. The basic premise of mathematical equations holds absolutely true here: since the vehicles are different, if “Person A plus lorry” is deemed to be equal to “Person B plus bicycle” then it follows that Person A and Person B are not equal. This simple truth underpins the whole problem of defining people by their mode of transport: if we treat all road users as homogeneous … Continue reading The Lion’s Share –via Singletrack Magazine